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CLAY 2018: Thunder Bay

Servant Event: Tranquille Farm

On Friday, August 15, CLAY participants travelled to Tranquille Farm, located about 15 minutes outside of Kamloops.

Preparing to load the buses at TRU. Photo by Hannah Shirtliff.

Preparing to load the buses at TRU. Photo by Hannah Shirtliff.

Over the past 200 years, Tranquille has functioned as a settlement, a tuberculosis sanatorium, a home for people with intellectual disabilities, and a medical training centre. The town also played an important role in the 1857 Klondike Gold Rush. Tranquille was abandoned in 1985 after the closure of the medical training centre, but people continued to visit, drawn in by rumours that the settlement was haunted. It was also a popular filming location.

CLAY 2014 Participant at Tranquille Farm.

CLAY 2014 Participant at Tranquille Farm. Photo by Hannah Shirtliff.

Now British Columbians are working on redeveloping Tranquille into an urban farm and a fully-functioning town. CLAY participants were invited to Tranquille to help clean up the shoreline along the bay, move irrigation pipes in a field, weed the vegetable garden and harvest produce, and clean up a popular hiking trail.

CLAY participant moving irrigation pipes. Photo by Hannah Shirtliff.

CLAY participant moving irrigation pipes. Photo by Hannah Shirtliff.

CLAY participants were able to get off-campus and explore a beautiful piece of God’s creation in British Columbia. The vision for Tranquille – a sustainable community centred around local food production – ties into issues that CLAY participants are learning about this weekend in Ministry Projects such as PWRDF’s “Have you Eaten Today? Exploring food issues both locally and globally”. (http://fredsays.ca/) We hope that CLAY participants left Tranquille with a deeper appreciation for the passion and work that goes into creating ethical and sustainable food systems.

For more information on Tranquille, visit: http://tranquillefarmfresh.ca/ 

– Hannah Shirtliff, CLAY 2014 Communications Coordinator